3 Old School Marketing Strategies to Growth Hack Your Crypto Project in 2022

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If you’re planning your own crypto launch this year, I’ve got three sure-fire ways to light the fuse.

Keep It Simple

Whatever your project is, the single most important way to spread the news is by making the message child’s play. Take time to dissect and distil your idea into the most potent version you can. The simpler you can make your message, the easier it will be to cut through the static. Don’t expect a picnic though, breaking down your concept will be tougher than you think.

As Mark Twain famously wrote, “I’m sorry I wrote such a long letter, I didn’t have time to write a short one.” Compiling a concise version of your project may be an art, but unlike some art, it’s a skill anyone can learn. First, cut out the jargon. If you need to explain a concept like a DAO (digital autonomous organisation) then do so, but keep it brief. Next, avoid repetition. Read and re-read your copy. Pass it around the office, and indeed, pass it around outside the office. Cut out anything that makes it sound like a broken record.

Finally, cut it down again. Remember when a salesperson is trying to sell something, they refer to the brochure, not the manual. There is a paradox that too many unsuccessful projects fall foul to. It’s the belief that by including EVERYTHING they will generate more interest when the opposite is true. By throwing too much data into the mix, you run the risk of boring people, and, in today’s Google era, we’ve never had shorter attention spans. Aim for a single page press release, 500 words long, with a killer headline.

Sell the Scoop

The key to a successful press release isn’t the wording, the format, or even the timing, although that is important. Successful press releases sell the story. The story is the hook, and a good hook is what every blogger, journalist, editor and content creator is looking out for in every email.

Finding your story is tougher than you might think. Indeed, your story may not even be what you think it is. The hook may not even be about your project at all. It could be something to do with your team, your location or even something from your past. It takes practice and a good deal of thinking to work out the best story and like ‘keeping it simple’, it’s often a team sport. So, why not get everyone together and crack out the whiteboard?

Start with the project itself. Is there anything about it that is particularly relevant to the world in the precise second? What about in the future, will your project lead to something new down the line? Try to forget what it does and how it works, and focus on instead what it could achieve, where it could lead or what it took to get you here. The key to a good story is emotion. Is yours an underdog’s tale? Are you breaking new boundaries? Could it spark controversy? No matter how cool and clever your project is, your story may be something even almost unrelated, but finding an emotive human hook can make your chances of telling the world far greater.

Plan Ahead

Reading this article is a great first step as it shows you’re already on this path, so kudos to you. Now keep up that momentum and get organised. Prior to launch, set a sensible date to hit the green button. By sensible, I mean don’t choose a national holiday, a religious festival, a worldwide day of mourning, or anything else you could see coming with a broken telescope when the eyes of the press are planted firmly elsewhere.

Of course, we can’t predict the future, but we can predict the past so be careful when choosing your launch date.

Next, work backwards and set up a realistic schedule for getting the information out. Depending on your project you’ll likely want to consider international, national and local press and set targets for your distribution. You’ll want to give everyone the best chance to get the story, and if you’ve followed my advice so far, you’ll have a sexy bite-sized stick of dynamite ready to throw.

Working backwards again, you’ll want to identify anyone you think would be a good contender to amp your message. So, stick a reminder on your planner/Trello/whatevs a week before to research potential PR targets. Going backwards another week, you’ll need to make sure any potential influencers/box openers/affiliate marketers/streamers etc. have access to a working version of your project.

Content creators need time to shoot and edit which is why you’ll want to make sure they have access to your project before the traditional press. The week before that, you’ll probably want to research all those folks and make sure you have a working prototype ready to go.

Before doing any of this, however, there’s one group you’ll need to consider above all others. You may not have one yet and indeed your project may not need one, but if you do have a community, this is where your planning should start. If your project is going to change the world, it’ll need some help. This is where your community comes in. However, these people found you, so we can assume for the most part they are on your team and want to help you shake things up.

It is essential that you keep your community on the side and the best way to do that is by keeping them in the loop. By updating, engaging and above all being transparent with your crew you will earn their respect and trust. Don’t be afraid, to be honest with them if things go sideways on occasion. Your community is on your side, and people understand we don’t live in a perfect world.

The other factor to consider when communicating with your community is to listen to them. You never know who’s involved, and you might find their advice and support invaluable. How do you know Elon Musk isn’t following your Discord channel? So, start with your community, keep them in the loop, be honest with them, even if there are hurdles ahead, and above all listen to them.

In Conclusion

So, there we have it. Three simple strategies to ensure a smooth launch and plain sailing for your crypto ship. In summary, we can break it down into just the three short headers. Keep it simple, sell the scoop, and plan ahead. Sure, we could have talked about next-gen, white/black hat, crypto-chicanery, and other opaque dark arts, but in the end, simple wins every time. I hope you enjoyed this brief guide and I wish you luck with your project.

If you’re planning your own crypto launch this year, I’ve got three sure-fire ways to light the fuse.

Keep It Simple

Whatever your project is, the single most important way to spread the news is by making the message child’s play. Take time to dissect and distil your idea into the most potent version you can. The simpler you can make your message, the easier it will be to cut through the static. Don’t expect a picnic though, breaking down your concept will be tougher than you think.

As Mark Twain famously wrote, “I’m sorry I wrote such a long letter, I didn’t have time to write a short one.” Compiling a concise version of your project may be an art, but unlike some art, it’s a skill anyone can learn. First, cut out the jargon. If you need to explain a concept like a DAO (digital autonomous organisation) then do so, but keep it brief. Next, avoid repetition. Read and re-read your copy. Pass it around the office, and indeed, pass it around outside the office. Cut out anything that makes it sound like a broken record.

Finally, cut it down again. Remember when a salesperson is trying to sell something, they refer to the brochure, not the manual. There is a paradox that too many unsuccessful projects fall foul to. It’s the belief that by including EVERYTHING they will generate more interest when the opposite is true. By throwing too much data into the mix, you run the risk of boring people, and, in today’s Google era, we’ve never had shorter attention spans. Aim for a single page press release, 500 words long, with a killer headline.

Sell the Scoop

The key to a successful press release isn’t the wording, the format, or even the timing, although that is important. Successful press releases sell the story. The story is the hook, and a good hook is what every blogger, journalist, editor and content creator is looking out for in every email.

Finding your story is tougher than you might think. Indeed, your story may not even be what you think it is. The hook may not even be about your project at all. It could be something to do with your team, your location or even something from your past. It takes practice and a good deal of thinking to work out the best story and like ‘keeping it simple’, it’s often a team sport. So, why not get everyone together and crack out the whiteboard?

Start with the project itself. Is there anything about it that is particularly relevant to the world in the precise second? What about in the future, will your project lead to something new down the line? Try to forget what it does and how it works, and focus on instead what it could achieve, where it could lead or what it took to get you here. The key to a good story is emotion. Is yours an underdog’s tale? Are you breaking new boundaries? Could it spark controversy? No matter how cool and clever your project is, your story may be something even almost unrelated, but finding an emotive human hook can make your chances of telling the world far greater.

Plan Ahead

Reading this article is a great first step as it shows you’re already on this path, so kudos to you. Now keep up that momentum and get organised. Prior to launch, set a sensible date to hit the green button. By sensible, I mean don’t choose a national holiday, a religious festival, a worldwide day of mourning, or anything else you could see coming with a broken telescope when the eyes of the press are planted firmly elsewhere.

Of course, we can’t predict the future, but we can predict the past so be careful when choosing your launch date.

Next, work backwards and set up a realistic schedule for getting the information out. Depending on your project you’ll likely want to consider international, national and local press and set targets for your distribution. You’ll want to give everyone the best chance to get the story, and if you’ve followed my advice so far, you’ll have a sexy bite-sized stick of dynamite ready to throw.

Working backwards again, you’ll want to identify anyone you think would be a good contender to amp your message. So, stick a reminder on your planner/Trello/whatevs a week before to research potential PR targets. Going backwards another week, you’ll need to make sure any potential influencers/box openers/affiliate marketers/streamers etc. have access to a working version of your project.

Content creators need time to shoot and edit which is why you’ll want to make sure they have access to your project before the traditional press. The week before that, you’ll probably want to research all those folks and make sure you have a working prototype ready to go.

Before doing any of this, however, there’s one group you’ll need to consider above all others. You may not have one yet and indeed your project may not need one, but if you do have a community, this is where your planning should start. If your project is going to change the world, it’ll need some help. This is where your community comes in. However, these people found you, so we can assume for the most part they are on your team and want to help you shake things up.

It is essential that you keep your community on the side and the best way to do that is by keeping them in the loop. By updating, engaging and above all being transparent with your crew you will earn their respect and trust. Don’t be afraid, to be honest with them if things go sideways on occasion. Your community is on your side, and people understand we don’t live in a perfect world.

The other factor to consider when communicating with your community is to listen to them. You never know who’s involved, and you might find their advice and support invaluable. How do you know Elon Musk isn’t following your Discord channel? So, start with your community, keep them in the loop, be honest with them, even if there are hurdles ahead, and above all listen to them.

In Conclusion

So, there we have it. Three simple strategies to ensure a smooth launch and plain sailing for your crypto ship. In summary, we can break it down into just the three short headers. Keep it simple, sell the scoop, and plan ahead. Sure, we could have talked about next-gen, white/black hat, crypto-chicanery, and other opaque dark arts, but in the end, simple wins every time. I hope you enjoyed this brief guide and I wish you luck with your project.

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